Chris Larkin, News, Pictures, Buzz

Source: Google
Chris Larkin
  June 7-8: Mother Night, Lucy Kalanithi &
San Francisco ExaminerJune 7-8: Mother Night, Lucy Kalanithi & John Duberstein, Chanticleer, Trina Robbins, Vulfpeck, Chris James ...San Francisco Examiner[5 to 6 p.m., S.F. Public Library, Learning Studio, fifth floor, 100 Larkin St., S.F.]. Gilbert Baker Celebration of Life: The creator of the rainbow flag, who died March 31, is remembered at a free multimedia event. [7 p.m., Castro Theatre, 429 Castro ...
Posted on 7 June 2017 | 12:01 am
  Thai EV policy 'just in time' - Mining
Mining Journal (subscription)Thai EV policy 'just in time'Mining Journal (subscription)Larkin cited recent research by UBS that suggested the cost of EV ownership and running costs would reach parity with internal combustion engines in Europe by 2018, and that EVs would account for one in three cars sold on the continent by 2025. “If UBS ...
Posted on 31 May 2017 | 4:06 am
  The 100's Finale Changes Everything: All You
E! OnlineThe 100's Finale Changes Everything: All You Need to Know About ...E! OnlineEP Jason Rothenberg teases what comes next after The 100's intense season 5 finale that aired Wednesday, May 24 on the CW.The 100 Season 4 Finale Recap: "Praimfaya"AppsforPCdaily'The 100' Recap: Season 4 Finale — Clarke's Sacrifice, Season 5 Spoilers | TVLineTVLineall 54 news articles »
Posted on 24 May 2017 | 7:38 pm
  Wednesday's TV Highlights: The CW's 'Arrow'
Los Angeles TimesWednesday's TV Highlights: The CW's 'Arrow' on KTLALos Angeles TimesEliza Taylor, Bob Morley, Paige Turco, Marie Avgeropoulos, Devon Bostick, Lindsey Morgan, Christopher Larkin, Richard Harmon, Zach McGowan, Isaiah Washington and Henry Ian Cusick star. 9 p.m. KTLA. Empire Demi Moore, joining the cast full time next ...
Posted on 23 May 2017 | 8:04 pm
  Interview: 'The 100's' Devon Bostick
HypableInterview: 'The 100's' Devon Bostick reflects on Jasper's heartbreaking journeyHypableIn the end, he died with Monty (Christopher Larkin) — his best friend on and off screen — by his side, their goodbye scene tragic both because Jasper was dying and because Monty had to watch it happen. As a fan of the show, and as someone who has ...
Posted on 21 May 2017 | 3:26 pm
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Source: Yahoo
Chris Larkin
  James Graham's mischevous account of the
James Graham's mischevous account of the heady days following the last election is Where’s Wally? for people who watch Newsnight.
Posted on 27 March 2015 | 9:35 pm
  West Cumbrian clubs fail to shine
South Cumbria came out on top in all three games with west Cumbrian sides in the Cumbria Men’s League.
Posted on 23 March 2015 | 3:39 am
  London Poet Stevie Smith Drowns In Suburban
Zoë Wanamaker does her best in a dull play.
Posted on 18 March 2015 | 3:12 am
Source: Bing
Chris Larkin
  Brewer Consulting
In the second of his two articles, Chris Larkin, associate director, Brewer Consulting continues his look at delay analysis, and the importance of choosing the correct technique for any given situation... In the first of two articles on the subject ...
Posted on 23 August 2015 | 10:00 am
  Is Downton's Dowager really Kenneth Williams
Toby Stephens is now a distinguished and dashing leading man - his father, but without the booze. His brother, Chris Larkin, a character actor, is possibly a more interesting and durable performer - his mother in miniature. After her divorce from Stephens ...
Posted on 20 August 2015 | 8:30 am
  Expand: A Chat with Creator Chris Johnson
This is why I’ve worked really closely with Chris Larkin who has composed such a fantastic score for the game. Expand started at a game jam about the end of the world. I was creating a game where players had to jump between planets while they were being ...
Posted on 13 August 2015 | 10:46 pm
  TV tonight: '100,' 'Black-ish,' 'CSI;Cyber'
USA TODAY's Robert Bianco previews "The 100" on CW for Wednesday, March 11. VPC Eve Harlow as Maya, left, Marie Avgeropoulos as Octavia, and Chris Larkin as Monty on 'The 100.' (Photo: Cate Cameron, The CW) The 100 CW, 9 ET/PT This CW drama ends its season ...
Posted on 10 March 2015 | 10:17 pm
  THE 100 Season 2 Episode 15 Photos Blood
The 100 Season 2 Episode 15 Photos Blood Must Have Blood, Part One : ONE STEP FORWARD ... Paige Turco, Isaiah Washington, Henry Ian Cusick and Chris Larkin also star. Omar Madha directed the episode written by Aaron Ginsburg & Wade McIntyre (#215).
Posted on 1 March 2015 | 5:55 am
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Source: Twitter
Chris Larkin
  kiwiphul: RT @uniaus: Best day at work ever:
kiwiphul: RT @uniaus: Best day at work ever: @UniofAdelaide alum and composer asked to re-do the sounds for 80’s ic~#ic video game PacMan. https://t.…
Posted on 28 June 2017 | 8:44 pm
  IntlUAdel: RT @uniaus: Best day at work
IntlUAdel: RT @uniaus: Best day at work ever: @UniofAdelaide alum and composer asked to re-do the sounds for 80’s ic#%%&ic video game PacMan. https://t.…
Posted on 28 June 2017 | 8:44 pm
  bachirelkhoury: Chris Larkin's Working
bachirelkhoury: Chris Larkin's Working Miniature Apple II Replica - https://t.co/AElTwqYSJ5 #MiniApple #AppleReplica #Tested.Com #CoolStuff #MadScience
Posted on 28 June 2017 | 8:44 pm
  arthuryeow: RT @uniaus: Best day at work
arthuryeow: RT @uniaus: Best day at work ever: @UniofAdelaide alum and composer asked to re-do the sounds for 80’s ic@&~^ic video game PacMan. https://t.…
Posted on 28 June 2017 | 8:44 pm
  WhosOnTV: Agatha Christie's Marple: Chris
Whos^~!@TV: Agatha Christie's Marple: Chris Larkin (Gerald Wright) played Lynley in The Shakespeare Code in 2007.
Posted on 28 June 2017 | 8:44 pm
Source: Answers
Chris Larkin
  Open Question: Is it obvious that Chris Sabo
Sabo always said it was a teammates bat & not his but that he would never name him. The bat had the number 11 in black marker so it is pretty obvious who it belonged to. Since Larkin had the most to lose would you say he made a payoff to keep Sabo quiet? Sabo was suspended 7 games without pay but i'm sure Larkin covered him for more then that. Larkin was a good player but not a hall of famer . He got in because he made friends as a broadcaster with writers that can vote. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft-pWVaRnQ8
Posted on 4 July 2015 | 4:26 pm
  Resolved Question: In a blacktop game what
Which team of point guards is the best? Team 1: Trey Burke John Wall Chris Paul Brandon Jennings Deron Williams Team 2: Tony Parker Derrick Rose Shane Larkin Stephen Curry Ty Lawson Team 3 Russel Westbrook Rajon Rando Michael Carter Williams Kyrie Irving Tyreke Evans @Me Gusta No its not racis, a game played on blacktop in a park is a blacktop game
Posted on 14 July 2013 | 7:38 am
  Resolved Question: Who's heard of The Self
Does anyone else know of this man or what he teaches? Is he real or another George Dill"hole"man? I noticed Mr. Ross wasn't wearing a gi or a black belt while demonstrating his sh*t though! I believe Mr. Ross trained that shmo Chris Pizzo. Are these guys the same as Tim Larkin, Kelly MCcann, Michael Janich and Jeff Anderson?
Posted on 19 September 2011 | 6:22 am
  Resolved Question: I have a question for all
Bottom line is I want to become the best martial artist I can be. I have had a lot from life which I am grateful I still have a roof over my head, and my health is back. I've took a lot of crap from people. I want to be able to walk away from a fight knowing that I could've shattered that person, I have a lot of anger in me ... Currently I'm a 6th kyu in wado ryu karate and I practice regular (3-4 times a week), however I find it quite limiting. I'm not disrespecting the art, but it's probably because of my sensei as others criticise him (too lenient, doesn't teach well). I don't even know the meaning of my katas, we just walk through it. Literally! I don't feel confident or disciplined. I don't feel like I could execute my techniques in a real life scenario and would probably have to rely on my "natural fighter" instincts. I love shotokan tho. It truly is beautiful, the exaggerated katas etc. my dad has done it for 10 years, and 20 years on since he last trained he executes techniques like a sensei should. This is what I want to become. I am a girl and I have had many fights and only one was with a girl, the rest all boys. I'm considering joining a shotokan club soon. However, I'd also like to do Wing Chun or TKD. I love the intimidating blocks in WC and the amazing kicks in TKD. But my question is; What do you do? What has it done for you? Do you feel better? How much has it benefitted you? And a detailed answer about your style please :) Also, I want to be able to take on multiple attackers if I have to. I asked my sensei what to do if I got into this situation and he said run. I asked what if I'm grabbed, he still said run. Lol :/
Posted on 25 August 2011 | 2:03 pm
 
I've heard that Bak Mei was descended from Dragon and Beggar style. This connects them to some of the heretical factions of Taoism, which in turn leads us to an export of such precepts to Japan in the form of Ninjutsu. So what are the similarities in technique, application, principle, and lineage? Any notable differences in application and philosophy? OC Bunjinkan and ISDS are respectively students of Taijutsu and Pak Mei. Be interesting to hear their response on this matter. @ Some people may feel this is what all martial arts do, but some styles focus more on attempting to defend oneself and doing minimal harm to the attacker. It was the Age of Swords, the Age of Warring States, in such times. As such, there were always those who had different philosophies on how to handle conflict. After all, do we not see it here today. There are millions of opinions on how to handle "street fights" and that's from people who don't necessarily have any street fights in their life. But in a day and age where robbery, rape, looting, assassination, death squad executions, and such were all too common, humans got motivated to do more than just talk the talk. @"Mei and Fong Tou Tak on the other. Politically, Ng Mui, Chee Seen and Mui Hein wanted to overthrow the Qing, whereas Pak Mei and Fong Tou Tak supported the government. Pak Mei's distinguished disciple, Kuo Chun Chong, was the military commander for the two provinces of Fujan and Guangdong. Led by Pak Mei and with the help of Fong Tou Tak and their followers, Kuo Chun Chong and the Qing army destroyed the second southern Shaolin Temple at Jiulian Shan." Starting to sound like Romance of the Three Kingdoms. I like that kind of stuff. @"Of the Five Shaolin Grandmaster, the best fighter was Ng Mui, a woman, and not Pak Mei." Probably cause in the patriarchal society of that time, you had better be good as a woman to earn your place. There was no shortcuts or social status crutches. A great motivator to exceed one's limitations. Societal or natural. One of my goals at Y!A was to discover more about martial arts. The system and school I most relate to and which I have learned the most from, is entirely Westernized. No lineages, no mystical MA themes, and no reference at all to any MA. While that makes it easy for a beginner in the West to start in, I eventually got curious about some things often left unstead by the instructors. The 3 top or founding instructors, Tim Larkin, Chris R-Burh, and Torin are interesting contrasts. Chris RB looks almost thin given his height and normal muscled forearms. Torin is like the small guy that weighs 150. Tim Larkin is the "monster" with the big biceps and forearms. Larkin started from the SEAL BUDs program for martial arts training, I presume. So weight lifting and hard/external focus was the gig for him. But Chris RB has been practicing martial arts for just as long (20 plus years), but he doesn't have the physique of a normal external MA. Yet he explicitly said that he trained in a school in San Diego, walked in right off the street due to the grapevine, after becoming disenchanted with McDojos. There are some interesting parallels between Pai Mei and certain things in the training methodology I was taught. While Chrs RB highly praises the school he found as the real deal, he never mentioned it by name. If it was a similar closed style to Pai Mei, that might explain things. I thank both Oc Bujinkan and ISDS for providing a fact filled run journey through their respective systems and traditions. It was highly informative. @OC My background philosophy closely skews or is equivalent to ISDS' noted Pai Mei philosophy. So I'm more familiar with that mental training than Ninpo Taijutsu. However, part of the H2H training subset they gave me was strict acknowledgement of the disadvantages of H2H vs range tools or firearms. Thus the tactic there is to feign weakness and use social skills to lure the target within range of my offensive strike capabilities. The primary consideration is survival first, then secondly legal issues. Rather than the reverse. Legal first and survival second. Bad priority. Distraction and deception tactics are notably used when tied up (hands) or attempting to disarm enemy tool users. Advanced forms that require total expertise in the fundamentals. I'm personally not as proficient there as I would like. "Nishina Daisuke" That's a funny last name (or first name). In Japanese, Dai suke means very much like(d). Love sub for like. "I can not speak to the application, since I've not seen it." Would you like to give some examples of your school's demonstrations of an application? I perceive that Budo Taijutsu is more closely related to Pai Mei's philosophy on H2H. I presume, though, that Budo has a much greater focus on melee tool techniques. Which is hard to adapt for the modern world. Self defense laws would essentially be the emperor backing the budo user. Stay within legitimate force, at least what a jury would consider legitimate given the evidence, and even homicide can be ruled as justified. P.S. Forgot to mention this earlier. I call TFT's training methodology unorthodox because they don't teach people how to run. (Plus other stuff they do differently) The physical training is solely limited to tactical engagements. Strategic retreats or strategic envelopment or strategic preparation, all that stuff is assumed to have already happened before the actual engagement. TFT assumes people already have common sense in this matter and advises that their H2H is only designed to terminate people's ability to think and move, not to "solve problems" or to teach people a lesson. This was a fine point I didn't fully grasp until I read a supplementary guide on SDefense. I'm a bad runner anyways, so I suppose that fits me. To run, I have to be aware of a threat 100 meters away. That's the awareness in strategy part of scouting on a battlefield. @ISDS: I think one of the reasons why Pai Mei doesn't have as many throws is because if they were designed to fight other MA, then it is very hard to take away the center of trained fighters. But in TFT, most of our opponents will be criminals and untrained drug addicts/sellers/crazypeople. And it is ridiculously easy to take their center away from them. Thus came the art of the head thump. Using the planet as an egg cracker. Saves time and energy. The joint breaks are a similar light. Because there is a police system and a legal self defense definition constraining our actions, dislocating a shoulder or breaking a wrist can take out an attacker and be ruled legitimate use of force. But lethal force is often restricted to a slim set of scenarios that can be proved. So often, the criminal is unconscious from a joint break. You can leave him alone and let the police handle him. Pai Mei was in an environment where leaving wounded enemies behind, might not be such a good idea. Guy will report to the army who you were, what you looked like, and where you were located. And what kind of moves you used. Vital military secrets of Kung Fu could be leaked and thus endanger the rest of the school. Killing, thus, became more convenient a solution in risks vs benefits. And, of course, death ends a fight. So there's confidence and reliability there. A person can still fight with a broken joint, just not really... well. Given the body conditioning they took, they might be able to reproduce methamphetamine benefits to fight pain. But no matter how good a person's body conditioning, they still need oxygen to live and fight. Hence a broken throat is effective against all. Just remembered something else. Back in those days, there wouldn't have been a lot of stone roads around. So people fought, most of the time, in dirt and grass or swamps and rivers. Throwing somebody there, doesn't necessarily mean they will be permanently broken. But we live in America. And there's a lot of concrete roads around... So might as well use it heh. For those interested in some background information on Chinese Kung Fu, I found an article on Beggar's Style. http://www.bgtent.com/naturalcma/CMAarticle28.htm The authenticity and the rest of the material in the articles listed seem very precise and well researched. Although I'm only beginner level in the research of Chinese lineages. @OC"Not very helpful, is it? :)" The description is simple enough to grasp. But for those that don't know the vocabulary or technique names, a video would fill in that specific gap. Description of physical motion was always something hard to communicate through language. I suppose that's why the Japanese like to name every special move in existence. On the cousin reference, it sounds like a combination of strategic deterrence and tribal psychological warfare. In many cultures and families, if you kill some significant other in their group, they must wear themselves to revenge upon you, come hell or high water. A cultural and honor issue. Thus one could avoid that by adapting tactics to the specific strategic outcome desired. I understand sink in the context of the dragon style and as one of the four fundamental mechanics of Pai Mei. To adapt the method of throwing I learned from TFT, the principle was to simply take the center of gravity and support away from the foe and replace it with my own. Thus to make someone fall over, I could replace his own center with my own in a hip throw. Or I could simply roll into his knee/thighs and drop my weight on the back of his head, forcing him to try to fall into his own feet. Which forces his center to go into a body flip forwards. As such, any presence of such principles would constitute a throw for any move. Judging by what you have said, the actual application before the throw is immaterial in Nin, so long as you can erase the person's connection to the earth and connection to yourself (presumably to prevent grappling) @OC: A lot of things concerning balance that you have written on, as well as the video, reminds me of stuff I have trained in as well. The instructors just stated it slightly differently, because we were applying it for different purposes. Our objective was to cause an injury (medically judged, not subjective pain). Thus understanding how the human body moves when injured was critical in chaining future attacks. As well as recognizing whether the target was actually damaged or not. How severe the damage was even. If you look up my Questions, there's some videos I posted on TFT's training and what it looks like. At least, one type of training. @"but if you want to see better stuff" As a result of the kind of training I use as well as some personal quirks of mine, I don't judge quality or ability on what techniques are used or how complex they are or whether the person it is being used on is good or bad (skill wise). I judge a person's ability on their balance, body coordination, body mechanics, their understanding of what they are using, and harmonious flow. From those criteria, the sensei shown is very good. The art of misdirection, fooled my eyes. I understand all the joint locks and balance manipulations he used. The hidden weapons or other tricks, however, aren't in my training set. Like a magic trick, for those that don't know the trick it can seem very surprising. And in the case of real world application, ending with lethal consequences. @http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xV64OIN7YY8&feature=related Now that's funny. The leverages are the same in TFT. Not sure if that is coincidence or not. Weapons. 4:46 @TFT has weapon (blade, stick, gun) training sets, but it uses the same principles as H2H training sets. So most people train their H2H first since having an extra tool is just an add on. The funny stuff is the CQB pistol scenario. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7A-EJ_trFg&feature=related Younger version of Hatsumi Maasaki perhaps. This is all very interesting. The ninja hand configurations. I memorized some for meditation practice. A specific breathing rhythm went along with making those things. My hypothesis was that this was self-hypnosis. Hypnosis works on things like anchors to reproduce ingrained behaviors. Make someone think about joy as you touch their chin plus a verbal word. Then touch their chin again and they will feel joy. A ninja repeats a hand pattern and a word, which allows him to sink into a specific ingrained pattern of breathing and calm. Seeing the dark... probably more complex. Both are equally valuable answers on a complicated and comprehensive topic that also necessitates at least two views. Putting it up for a vote since if I pick, I'd just be throwing a coin in the air.
Posted on 1 November 2010 | 9:57 am



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