Peter Mullan, News, Pictures, Buzz

Source: Google
Peter Mullan
  Police welcome sentencing of man for drugs
Police welcome sentencing of man for drugs offencesBelfast NewsletterDetective Inspector Peter Mullan from PSNI's Organised Crime Branch said: “Police will continue in our efforts to make Northern Ireland a safer place to live and work by proactively investigating and arresting people involved in serious criminality ...
Posted on 21 June 2017 | 4:43 am
  New film and TV incentive fund generates
The ScotsmanNew film and TV incentive fund generates £17m for Scottish ...The ScotsmanA new incentive fund to help bring films and TV productions to Scotland has generated a £17.5 million return on investment in its first 18 months - 10 times more ...and more »
Posted on 21 June 2017 | 4:23 am
  Tommy's Honour movie screening Lake Geneva -
Tommy's Honour movie screening Lake GenevaKenosha News“An engrossing and accessible celebration of the game's modern origins, enhanced by striking locations and a standout cast, led by Scottish actors Peter Mullan and Jack Lowden,” wrote The Hollywood Reporter's Justin Lowe. Audience reaction, Kreutzer ...
Posted on 18 June 2017 | 4:53 pm
  What to Stream This Weekend: Five Movies for
The New YorkerWhat to Stream This Weekend: Five Movies for Father's DayThe New YorkerInstead, her father (Peter Mullan, in a terrifyingly violent performance) keeps her there as a virtual servant and has even crueler plans for her. Chris's fierce efforts at self-liberation, and a self-image that's deeply imbued with the memory of ...
Posted on 16 June 2017 | 3:50 pm
  Wisconsin dentist James Kreutzer brings
Lake Geneva Regional NewsWisconsin dentist James Kreutzer brings story of Scottish father and son who popularized the modern game of golfLake Geneva Regional NewsOld Tom is played by Peter Mullan and Jack Lowden plays the younger Morris. One of the most important parts of making a film is finding the right director, said Kreutzer. He hired Jason Connery, son of Sir Sean Connery, of James Bond fame, to fill that ...
Posted on 14 June 2017 | 12:00 am
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Source: Yahoo
Peter Mullan
  Blue Skye thinking: Kristen Stewart tipped
The Great Getaway, also set to star Brendan Gleeson, will be a Scottish historical epic that won’t be ‘anti-English in any way’ Kristen Stewart and Brendan Gleeson have been lined up to star in a new film about the famous 18th-century flight of Bonnie Prince Charlie, reports the Scotsman . Titled The Great Getaway, the historical epic will shoot this June in Dumfries and Galloway. Scenes ...
Posted on 7 April 2015 | 1:45 am
  Emily Barker’s extreme folk: ‘You’ve
The queen of the moody TV theme tune on the thrill of making music with strangers – and recording straight to vinyl “This song is not about crime fighting in southern Sweden,” Emily Barker tells the audience at her local music venue, perched high above Stroud, in the Cotswolds. She is about to perform Nostalgia , the haunting theme tune for the BBC production of Wallander , starring Kenneth ...
Posted on 7 April 2015 | 12:00 am
  Epic battle to star in Bonnie Prince Charlie
THE biggest battle scene ever shot in Scotland is to be the bloody centrepiece of a new movie about Bonnie Prince Charlie.
Posted on 6 April 2015 | 6:59 am
  Postmortem: Banshee Boss on That Finale
[WARNING: The following story contains spoilers from Friday's finale of Banshee. Read at your own risk.]... [WARNING: The following story contains spoilers from Friday's finale of Banshee . Read at your own risk.]
Posted on 2 April 2015 | 8:47 pm
  TV.com's Top 30 Shows of the Past Five
Last week, we finished counting down our Top 30 TV Shows of the Half-Decade, a diverse list of series that just goes to show how much great television programming we have to choose from these days. And to cap off the festivities, we're back to present what many of you have been asking for: the individual Top 20 lists that we used to tabulate our collective Top 30. Below, you'll find our personal ...
Posted on 31 March 2015 | 2:03 am
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Source: Bing
Peter Mullan
  Deep Inside Hollywood
For his latest, "Sunset Song," based on the novel by Lewis Grassic Gibbon, he follows acclaimed Scottish actor Peter Mullan and model/actress Agyness Deyn as they navigate the hardships of rural life in that northernmost U.K. country. The film has its ...
Posted on 26 August 2015 | 8:15 am
  Spain’s Festival Films Nabs San Sebastian
Pic toplines Agyness Deyn, who is set to appear in the forthcoming Coen Brothers pic “Hail, Caesar,” Peter Mullan (“Tyrannosaur”) and Kevin Guthrie (“The Legend of Barney Thomson”). Terence Davies’ awaited adaptation of the novel by Scottish ...
Posted on 26 August 2015 | 3:07 am
  Runs in the family: Sean Connery's son Jason
Trainspotting actor Peter Mullan will portray Old Tom while young rising star Jack Lowden, who hails from the Scottish Borders, is playing the younger Morris. Jason commented: 'I am so incredibly passionate and excited to tell this story. 'It is truly ...
Posted on 20 August 2015 | 5:01 am
  Peebles given front row seats to new movie
Peter Mullan (Trainspotting, Sunshine on Leith, Stonemouth) will feature as Tom with Jack Lowden (The Tunnel, '71, Ghosts) playing Tommy. The scene being filmed in Peebles will feature Tommy and his girlfriend, Meg, walking up Bridgegate to the corner and ...
Posted on 20 August 2015 | 12:51 am
  Parfetts makes senior appointments in board
Peter Mullan is moving up to senior general manager in a promotion from general manager of Parfetts Stockport. Mullan will be working with the board of directors and assisting with company operational projects as well as continuing his general management ...
Posted on 16 August 2015 | 6:53 pm
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Source: Newsvine
Peter Mullan
  'Neds' wins Spanish top film award
British director Peter Mullan's film "Neds," has won this year's top award at Spain's San Sebastian Film Festival, organizers said Saturday.
Posted on 25 September 2010 | 9:20 am
Source: Twitter
Peter Mullan
  csltoronto: Control fear! "Sometimes
csltor#&*#to: C#&*#trol fear! "Sometimes you have to c#&*#fr#&*#t your dem#&*#s...to find a place where you can gain...understanding." Peter Mullan #performance
Posted on 22 June 2017 | 10:15 pm
  JakeGavinFilm: @bethpottinger47
JakeGavinFilm: @bethpottinger47 @kaneoliverparry Thank you Beth - as a director, Peter Mullan is a dream to work with...
Posted on 22 June 2017 | 10:15 pm
  BreckonRichards: I have sent my play to
Breck#!%Ric&~s: I have sent my play to Peter Mullan! I hope he likes it 🙏. #fireblight
Posted on 22 June 2017 | 10:15 pm
  weestie97: RT @pitmuxton: It's the
weestie97: RT @pitmuxt%#: It's the proprietorial at*@%ude that gets to me When will the English left realise that we want neighbours, not masters (per…
Posted on 22 June 2017 | 10:15 pm
  alicmurray: RT @pitmuxton: It's the
alicmurray: RT @pitmuxt%^@^: It's the proprietorial at*!^ude that gets to me When will the English left realise that we want neighbours, not masters (per…
Posted on 22 June 2017 | 10:15 pm
Source: Answers
Peter Mullan
  Resolved Question: Whats the movie where a
and one of the characters who die is afraid of the dark
Posted on 24 September 2016 | 2:32 pm
  Resolved Question: Is the movie The
The severe living conditions in Catholic Church-run laundries in 1964 Ireland are sensationalized to the point of caricature in writer-director Peter Mullan's problematic melodrama "The Magdalene Sisters" (Miramax). The fact that the austere Magdalene asylums existed is undeniable. Undoubtedly, a number of young women sent there by their parents or guardians were treated cruelly. However, Mullan puts forth an oversimplified, worst-case scenario in which every nun is a monster and the only priest connected with the laundry has forced a simple young woman confined there to yield to his sexual demands. An audience has a right to wonder whether the film is attempting to throw light on a painful, little-known situation or merely genuflecting at the altar of sensationalism while exploiting others' suffering. The film centers on four young women who were sent off to perform manual labor in facilities known as the "Magdalene laundries" in order to be spiritually rehabilitated for their alleged sins of the flesh. Mullan's narrative presents them as physically and verbally abused by the nuns in charge of the laundry as if the four actually existed. However, these characters are fictitious, made up from composites of stories Mullan heard from those who lived in the workhouses -- a fact muddied by the coda that appears at the end of the film explaining "what became of" each of the characters. As such, the movie's treatment of events exploits the facts to make it less a story of the four than a film aimed at positioning the church as one-dimensionally wicked. The nuns pictured are so uniformly sadistic and hypocritical that they make the infamous Nurse Ratched in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" seem like Mother Teresa. Unlike what follows, the film's opening scene is well-crafted. Using scant dialogue, it cinematically depicts young Margaret (Anne-Marie Duff) being lured upstairs during a wedding reception by her cousin, who then rapes her and proceeds to pin the blame on her. The next day her scornful parents turn her over to a priest who delivers her to a Magdalene laundry workhouse at the same time that orphaned flirt Bernadette (Nora-Jane Noone) and unwed mother Rose (Dorothy Duffy) arrive. This is the set-up. But beyond it, caricature trumps character. In place of narrative, the film unreels one horror after another on the four young women in lurid, episodic fashion: brutal beatings and malicious mind games by the nuns, including a group shower-room scene involving extended full frontal nudity and taunting insults aimed at dehumanizing their humiliated charges. The nuns, presented as consistently evil, money-grubbing, merciless hags, have no emotional depth. They are as exaggerated in their sadism as Ingrid Bergman is in celestial benevolence in "The Bells of St. Mary's" -- the film Sister Bridget sheds a crocodile tear over at a Christmas screening. Not one ounce of human kindness -- not to mention Christian compassion -- can be found under any wimple or collar. This painting with broad brush strokes is better suited for the propagandist than the dramatist. Regrettably, drama is jettisoned along with objectivity since this kind of stacking the deck drains the narrative of any inner tension. The result is a cavalcade of cartoonish vignettes which present to viewers about as nuanced a picture of Irish nuns as 1915's "The Birth of a Nation" did of African-Americans. This pervasive shallowness extends to the girls themselves. Despite overall strong performances, they serve as little more than props, punching bags for the sinister nuns to vent their fury. While some blame is attached to parents who so readily banished daughters in difficulty to the harsh conditions of these laundries, any attempt to understand the forces that shaped these institutions, which had much to do with the distinct religious and cultural milieu of the time and place in which they flourished, is rejected. The righteous indignation felt for the girls, while justified by the suffering they endured, is wrung out of the audience through cheap, kick-the-puppy melodrama where the audience is manipulated to cheer when the nuns get a taste of their own medicine. It's distressing that any Irish women had to endure the deplorable conditions of these workhouses. But the film never attempts to move beyond shrill finger-pointing toward any meaningful insights. In place of a sensitive examination of abuse of religious power, Mullan's simplistic approach
Posted on 2 February 2013 | 6:48 am
  Resolved Question: Is the movie The
The severe living conditions in Catholic Church-run laundries in 1964 Ireland are sensationalized to the point of caricature in writer-director Peter Mullan's problematic melodrama "The Magdalene Sisters" (Miramax). The fact that the austere Magdalene asylums existed is undeniable. Undoubtedly, a number of young women sent there by their parents or guardians were treated cruelly. However, Mullan puts forth an oversimplified, worst-case scenario in which every nun is a monster and the only priest connected with the laundry has forced a simple young woman confined there to yield to his sexual demands. An audience has a right to wonder whether the film is attempting to throw light on a painful, little-known situation or merely genuflecting at the altar of sensationalism while exploiting others' suffering. The film centers on four young women who were sent off to perform manual labor in facilities known as the "Magdalene laundries" in order to be spiritually rehabilitated for their alleged sins of the flesh. Mullan's narrative presents them as physically and verbally abused by the nuns in charge of the laundry as if the four actually existed. However, these characters are fictitious, made up from composites of stories Mullan heard from those who lived in the workhouses -- a fact muddied by the coda that appears at the end of the film explaining "what became of" each of the characters. As such, the movie's treatment of events exploits the facts to make it less a story of the four than a film aimed at positioning the church as one-dimensionally wicked. The nuns pictured are so uniformly sadistic and hypocritical that they make the infamous Nurse Ratched in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" seem like Mother Teresa. Unlike what follows, the film's opening scene is well-crafted. Using scant dialogue, it cinematically depicts young Margaret (Anne-Marie Duff) being lured upstairs during a wedding reception by her cousin, who then rapes her and proceeds to pin the blame on her. The next day her scornful parents turn her over to a priest who delivers her to a Magdalene laundry workhouse at the same time that orphaned flirt Bernadette (Nora-Jane Noone) and unwed mother Rose (Dorothy Duffy) arrive. This is the set-up. But beyond it, caricature trumps character. In place of narrative, the film unreels one horror after another on the four young women in lurid, episodic fashion: brutal beatings and malicious mind games by the nuns, including a group shower-room scene involving extended full frontal nudity and taunting insults aimed at dehumanizing their humiliated charges. The nuns, presented as consistently evil, money-grubbing, merciless hags, have no emotional depth. They are as exaggerated in their sadism as Ingrid Bergman is in celestial benevolence in "The Bells of St. Mary's" -- the film Sister Bridget sheds a crocodile tear over at a Christmas screening. Not one ounce of human kindness -- not to mention Christian compassion -- can be found under any wimple or collar. This painting with broad brush strokes is better suited for the propagandist than the dramatist. Regrettably, drama is jettisoned along with objectivity since this kind of stacking the deck drains the narrative of any inner tension. The result is a cavalcade of cartoonish vignettes which present to viewers about as nuanced a picture of Irish nuns as 1915's "The Birth of a Nation" did of African-Americans. This pervasive shallowness extends to the girls themselves. Despite overall strong performances, they serve as little more than props, punching bags for the sinister nuns to vent their fury. While some blame is attached to parents who so readily banished daughters in difficulty to the harsh conditions of these laundries, any attempt to understand the forces that shaped these institutions, which had much to do with the distinct religious and cultural milieu of the time and place in which they flourished, is rejected. The righteous indignation felt for the girls, while justified by the suffering they endured, is wrung out of the audience through cheap, kick-the-puppy melodrama where the audience is manipulated to cheer when the nuns get a taste of their own medicine. It's distressing that any Irish women had to endure the deplorable conditions of these workhouses. But the film never attempts to move beyond shrill finger-pointing toward any meaningful insights. In place of a sensitive examination of abuse of religious power, Mullan's simplistic approach
Posted on 2 February 2013 | 6:47 am
  Resolved Question: Who is the actor for Ted
Posted on 5 February 2012 | 3:54 am
  Resolved Question: Question is regarding
What is peter mullan's character explanation of tyrannosaur (which he explains to Hannah in one scene)? Scottish accent is sometimes hard to understand.
Posted on 14 December 2011 | 4:56 pm



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